WordPress vs Tumblr for Your Business Blog

Tumblr vs WordPress

There will be complaints. I can already smell the onslaught of, “what about Blogger” and “Typepad is much more powerful”. There will be others that say, “but Tumblr’s not really a blogging platform”. Let’s put all of that to rest quickly…

For business blogs, WordPress and Tumblr are the best options out there. I’d add “in my humble opinion” but that would detract from the absolute force of my opinion.

Google’s Blogger has made some amazing changes recently and I would not argue against it as a decent platform, but it lacks the plugin compatibility of WordPress and isn’t quite as easy to use as Tumblr, so it doesn’t fit into this particular argument. We’re going to focus on the two extremes – those who want the most powerful and those who want the easiest. Keep in mind, today’s blogging platforms are all easy to some extent as well as powerful. The most important criteria is access and comfort. In other words, if you’re doing well and posting consistently with Typepad, for example, don’t go changing because some guy says WordPress is more powerful or Tumblr is easier. If it works with you, keep at it.

 

WordPress is Powerful

PowerfulFor those who want the most gadgets, plugins, and flexibility, WordPress is the hands down winner for business blogging. It can act as a full-blown content management system for those who know how to use it, or it can stay true to its original calling and act as the premier blogging platform. There are so many themes available and dozens more being created every week. Perhaps most importantly, its PHP base allows it to works seamlessly with modern concepts such as adaptive website design and HTML5.

If your goal is to be a “power blogger” and post regularly, WordPress is ideal. It isn’t hard but there is definitely a learning curve associated with it. One does not simply start blogging out of the gate with WordPress. Here are some of the benefits of using it, particularly as a self-hosted installation rather than by adding a free blog on WordPress.com:

  • It has massive collection of plugins. The only bad part is that one must be careful not to install too many as it can slow down the site and bloat the code.
  • With caching, WordPress is practically indestructible. You could hit the front page of Yahoo with a story and still stay online with a decent host and the stories cached.
  • Google and Bing love the code. Between the instant pings once a post is published to the clean way that the code presents itself to the search engines, those who want to rank with their blog posts must use WordPress. It ranks better than Blogger, a Google property.
  • Decent access to social media through the right tools makes it one notch below Tumblr when it comes to true social media integration.

 

Tumblr is Easy

Easy ButtonDon’t get me wrong. Tumblr does have some robust features that allows it to be a strong platform for even the most active power bloggers, but that’s not the reason that you use it. It’s possible to post as quickly as you can type (or copy and paste in the case of image or video posts). The platform makes it super-easy to instantly format. For example, WordPress out-of-the-box requires the embed code plugged into the HTML to present a video. You have to know the dimensions of your blog and use the old embed code from YouTube. Tumblr, on the other hand, only needs the URL. It auto-formats it to the right size – no embed code needed.

If you are more concerned about the ability to get content posted easily and quickly and less concerned about whether it’s perfectly formatted, Tumblr is the right platform for your business. Here are some of the benefits:

  • A strong built-in community allows for instant visitors to your site through proper tagging.
  • Reblogging makes posting content easier than even posting the unique content. Unlike WordPress, Tumblr actually encourages reblogging and tracks it for the source.
  • Direct integration with Facebook and Twitter is native to Tumblr; there are WordPress plugins available, but native is always better for integration.
  • There is nothing wrong with using a subdomain on Tumblr.com. It’s just as robust as putting it on your own domain, whereas WordPress.com is a symbol of weakness.

Again, and I cannot stress this enough, all of the major blogging platforms are powerful and easy. You can do a ton with Tumblr and you can post quickly to WordPress. It really comes down to preference and what feels right for you. Whatever it takes to get you excited and active as a blogger for your business – that’s the right platform with which to go.

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JD Rucker

+JD Rucker is Editor at Soshable, a Social Media Marketing Blog. He is a Christian, a husband, a father, and founder of Dealer Authority. He drinks a lot of coffee, usually in the form of a 5-shot espresso over ice. Find him on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.

3 thoughts on “WordPress vs Tumblr for Your Business Blog

  1. I really got into confusion when I had to choose what blog platform to choose from. But finally gave into WordPress. Like you said it all comes down to preference and the kind of options we want. But I feel both are strong runners. :)

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