Why Teens Love Snapchat

Teens on Snapchat

I know the feeling that many parents get when they find out their kids are using Snapchat. It doesn’t matter how much you trust them. The first question that comes to mind for those parents that know anything about the temporary messaging system is, “are they sexting?”

Thankfully for most parents, you’re children are not. As much as mainstream media would love for us to believe that the service is evil and part of the moral degradation that is gripping our country, the standard Snapchatting teen is using the service because they really don’t want their actions as teens to catch up to them as adults. It’s a mentality that makes Snapchat such a hot service and parents need to understand that in many ways Snapchat is a good thing.

Don’t get me wrong. There are plenty of bad things that can happen on Snapchat and tons of reasons why parents should be concerned. Even if their children aren’t doing bad things on the service doesn’t mean that they’re not receiving bad things from their friends. It’s really no different from normal real-world interactions. Good things can happen and bad things can happen. It’s all about raising them to focus on the good things and to be able to handle the bad situations appropriately. It’s about parenting.

As was noted on Techcrunch today, kids see Facebook the way adults see LinkedIn:

Kids are in a petri dish, where their every social post can be scrutinized and used against them. That’s why disappearing media startup Snapchat is important, says its investor, Benchmark‘s Bill Gurley. Teens don’t want their daily lives permanently recorded. Gurley said at TechCrunch Disrupt Europe in Berlin that Snapchat board member Mitch Lasky’s kids tell him they view Facebook like adults view LinkedIn.

Read More: Techcrunch

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Reddit Looks to Investors for Help and Buzz, not Cash

Reddit Front Page

Reddit doesn’t have a cash problem. They had $20 million in the bank when they were given partial independence by Conde Nast two years ago and unless they’re buying solid gold servers and platinum-plated Macs to run the site, they probably have enough to keep going without a hitch for another decade. When Techcrunch reported rumors that the social news giant was looking for investors against a $400 million valuation, many of us wandered why they would risk losing their status as one of the most community-driven websites on the planet by playing into the hands of profit-driven venture capitalists.

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Forgive Me For Saying, But the Arrington/Huffington/AOLington Episode is Comical

Arrington Huffington AOL

Bloggers around the internet are patting themselves on the back. They are saying, “I told you so,” about the AOL/Techcrunch/HuffPo experiment. I, for one, am surprised. Call me silly, but I was cautiously optimistic that it wouldn’t blow up into a major debacle and that Arrington would be able to meet his 3-year commitment to AOL with only minor disturbances in the force.

I was wrong.

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Linkjacking is Good, Bad, and Ugly

Linkjacking means different things to different people.  Many see it as using the content on one site as the bait to get viewers to pass through your site, or even stay there and explore without going on to the primary content.  Most of the time, there will be tidbits or summary information about the primary story accompanied by an interesting image or bit of photoshop magic that takes up most of the page.

To many, including Urban Dictionary, a true “linkjacking” requires that a person from the website doing the linkjacking also submits the story to an aggregator such as Reddit or Digg to drive traffic.  I believe that websites and blogs that have a strong enough following to be able to “assume” someone will submit the story are also linkjacking, even if they are not the one’s doing the submitting.

The idea is to generate traffic from social media sites and even the search engines without having to write a ton of original content or do the research.  Here is an example of a website that I like a lot, Engadget, which is notorious for linkjacking: (more…)

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