Getting More Facebook Fans is NOT the Key to Social Success

Reach

I’m not a broken record, at least I’m not trying to be. It seems that I’ve covered this topic from different angles a lot lately, but it’s simply that important to understand. In business in general and in automotive marketing in particular, getting more Facebook fans is a very low priority compared to reaching more people.

This seems to be counter-intuitive. One might argue that getting more fans on Facebook is the way to reach more people, but they dynamics of the social network make it to where this isn’t the case. A page can be extremely successful and reach the masses with very few fans. Conversely, a page with hundreds of thousands of fans can reach next to nobody. It’s a challenging concept to understand until you get down into the way the Facebook algorithm works.

In essence, it’s not size but quality that counts the most on Facebook. Just because someone likes your page doesn’t mean that they’re going to see any of your posts. Just because someone doesn’t like your page doesn’t mean that they won’t see your posts. It’s for this reason that getting more likes is such a small component of the overall Facebook marketing picture.

Here’s a quick video I did for the automotive industry that highlights a couple of examples of this principle. In it, a decent Facebook page with 4K fans is getting 1/10th of the reach of a great Facebook page with 700 fans. If that isn’t convincing enough, I’m not sure what else to say.

Enhanced by Zemanta
About JD Rucker

+JD Rucker is Editor at Soshable, a Social Media Marketing Blog. He is a Christian, a husband, a father, and founder of Dealer Authority. He drinks a lot of coffee, usually in the form of a 5-shot espresso over ice. Find him on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.

Comments

  1. Maybe getting more Facebook fans doesn’t count so much, but how about getting shares for posts on the Facebook page or business website?

  2. Interesting topic; in the past I’ve done a lot of writing about using metrics beyond last click attribution models which are clearly not a good measure of social media marketing success. This is mainly because I’m an advocate of using social media for brand awareness and engagement, as opposed to directly linked ROI.

    If you’re interested, I wrote a piece recently about measuring ROI against a single ‘Like’ or ‘Tweet’ which might shed some light. Not trying to spam… http://www.poneill.co.uk/digital-marketing/social-media-marketing/measuring-roi-against-social-media

Speak Your Mind

*