Don’t Fear Your Customers on Social Media – Embrace Them!

Fear

I’ve shared this story before but it’s worth mentioned again. I was speaking to a client about their social media presence. Well, it was actually their lack of a social media presence. They didn’t have a Facebook page, they didn’t realize that they had a Twitter account that had been set to Tweet AutoBlog via RSS, and they through that Google+ was a premium service that Google was selling. Don’t laugh. This was one of the darkest days of my marketing career.

When I asked why they didn’t have a Facebook page at the very least, he said that “they don’t want people to have the ability to talk badly about them on Facebook.” After some explaining about how Facebook and social media in general worked, I got down to what was the real root of the problem. He said that he totally understood that they could post on their own Facebook profile without his permission or even knowledge, but if he had a Facebook page and he posted there then he would have to respond.

Exactly. You have to respond. You want to respond. Every customer challenge is an opportunity to shine.

 

Control the Feedback

Disney. Apple. Amazon. Johnson & Johnson. These are brands that regularly topped the “most loved” companies lists. They do what they can to try to make everyone happy. Despite being at the top of the list, they have haters. Many haters. Thousands, perhaps millions of people have a negative opinion of these loved brands.

Let’s look at it locally. There’s a Peruvian restaurant close to the office that we go to whenever we want to have a casual lunch. The food is amazing – the Lomo Saltado is the best way to fill up on $10. I took a friend there who loved Peruvian food and he hated it. He even said so on Yelp (granted, the service was uncannily awful that day, but the food didn’t impress him either). You simply can’t appeal to everyone.

Those who are going to complain about your business will find a way to complain no matter how hard you try to avoid it. The reality in today’s uber-connected world is that you can’t avoid it and you shouldn’t even try. In fact, you should embrace it by allowing as many venues such as Facebook to be the place where you want to hear their complaints.

When people post negative reviews to many of the review sites or tell the story of their experiences on their social media profiles, you often have no recourse. Many of the review sites allow you to reply and you definitely should, but it still goes onto a permanent record. The complaint is logged and you can’t take it down. In cases like those, it’s extremely important to reply whenever possible with empathy, professionalism, a sincere desire to improve through their feedback, and (whenever applicable) a willingness to make things right for them. It’s a best practice to reply to every review, good or bad, but that’s another blog post.

Now, imagine if you used your social media, Facebook in particular, as a venue through which people could voice their opinions about your business. Some would say that it would get more exposure that way, particularly if they have a lot of friends, but there’s a couple of reasons you’d want it here rather than on review sites. First, you definitely can and should reply to those comments. Using Facebook as a two-way communication tool allows you to shine through the dark moments and highlight the brighter ones.

The second reason is control. When they post a complaint to your Facebook page, you have the ability to control this portion of the conversation. If your reply is thoughtful and satisfactory to the user, awesome! If it starts to turn into an argument or the user becomes offensive, you have the ability to hide it. I do not recommend hiding complaints as a general practice. Take what you can from the feedback and improve your business. Stand behind your product and company and accept criticism with the professionalism and a desire to improve as I mentioned above. Hiding posts is a last resort and should only be used when the complaint turns offensive.

Thankfully, this post does not apply to many. Over the last couple of years there has been a wonderful shift towards the desire to be more open to feedback. It’s a necessity with today’s quick and easy methods of communication that are available to consumers. If you’re still missing the point and choose to do what the image for this blog post implies, I’m not sure what else to say that can help.

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About JD Rucker

+JD Rucker is Editor at Soshable, a Social Media Marketing Blog. He is a Christian, a husband, a father, and founder of Dealer Authority. He drinks a lot of coffee, usually in the form of a 5-shot espresso over ice. Find him on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.

Comments

  1. You can’t repeat this message often enough! Sometimes I feel like businesses run their life like a toddler “If I hold my eyes closed and I can’t see it, it’s not there”. The only thing worse for reputation management is a Social Media presence that is not maintained.

  2. I think the reason Applebee’s received so much abuse about their social media disaster was definitely partly due to them filtering out the complaints. I think it’s necessary to have critisim to be able to progress. This won’t always hurt your company but can definitely help you improve.

  3. Great points made here. I have experience situations and had simular conversations. Would help if you had a G+ button to make it easier to share your content.

  4. Couldn’t agree more with your point about never hiding negative comments. If you deal with these poorly, you run the risk of harming your relationship with other members of your community as well. Take negative comments in stride, make bad experiences great ones, and you’ll have a convert for life.

  5. I completely agree with your post. I think the recent controversy with Applebees demonstrates just this. After trying to cover up and delete their negative comments, people became even more infuriated. If marketers address their consumers concerns outright on social media for all to see, they will most likely be viewed in a more positive light for all to see.

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