This is the story of a very rich man who decided to get into something with which he had no experience. He was determined to win by insulting his competitors, using his business success as the basis for the move, and by throwing out ideas that sounded great to the layman.

We’re not talking about Donald Trump’s run for President… not yet, anyway. We’re talking about the sorted tale of Trump Air, an apostrophe in his resume that he likes to sweep under the rug whenever it’s brought up. In the late 80s, Donald Trump saw what was happening with air travel and felt that he had better ideas. He had the money and experience, both of which he inherited from his father, to accomplish great things in real estate. Certainly his ability to make a deal was enough to get him into the airline business. After all, how hard could it be to run an airline?

The story is long and there’s no need to rehash it, but we’ll give the short version. He bought an airline and proved that he had no idea how to run it. He had some successes that came about as a result of his tremendous business skills and ended up gaining nearly half of the market travelling between New York City, Washington DC, and Boston. That part of his promise was fulfilled. Unfortunately, it didn’t yield the desired results.

His miscalculations and horrific ideas endeared him to his supporters – passengers and airline employees – but proved to be undeniably foolish in the practical sense. From gold-colored fixtures in the bathrooms to flight attendants with mandatory faux-pearls around their necks, the Donald’s ego overruled his ignorance. For a more in-depth look at his airline adventures:

His ideas for the country aren’t very different, nor is the story. He claims competence in politics with the same bravado that he claimed competence in the airline world. Unfortunately, he failed to do his homework back then and is doing the same thing with his Presidential bid. One of his most naive ideas was to try to have the 727s in his fleet flown by two pilots instead of the required three in order to save money. It would be like asking a one-armed man to drive a big rig; in order to shift, he’d have to take his lone hand off the wheel. The FAA would never have allowed it, but Trump’s business-oriented mind thought it was a good idea.

The same holds true for his obscure policy recommendations. So far, his Presidential campaign promises have included concepts that will cost an extreme amount of additional expenditures added to the budget and at the same time he wants to reduce taxes across the board. His solution to the clear contradiction is to “make America rich” by bringing back jobs with tariffs and taxes that make it harder for American companies to do business offshore, but they’re somehow supposed to make more money by incurring more expenses and reducing their ability to sell their products abroad.

His proposed solutions for Americas problems are untenable, even more so than his proposed solutions for his airline. Unfortunately, his airline only lasted three years before he was forced to abandon ship. As President, he won’t have that option. The more likely scenario is that he’ll sink the country faster than he sunk his airline.

The only two differences between Trump Air and his Presidential run is that running an airline is easier than running a country and you can’t bail out of the Presidency after three years the way he did with his aviation abomination.

Trump Air

Written by JD Rucker
JD Rucker is Editor of this site as well as The New Americana, a Conservative News Aggregator. He is a Christian, a husband, a father, and co-founder of the Federalist Party. Find him on Twitter or Facebook.