3 Ways a Small Business can Make Money on Social Media

Money

For the majority of the last decade, social media was viewed by businesses as a frivolity; something they would dabble in to appease their devoted customer base.  However, with Social Media becoming ubiquitous in our lives through cell phones, tablets, and desktops, companies are beginning to realize that there are effective ways of monetizing their social media presence.

The caveat to making money on social media is that businesses can face a backlash from their followers if they abuse their social followings with too much monetization or they are solely interested in monetizing.

Thus, a balance has to be struck.  Businesses must still engage with their customers and give them value for following them.  And when they do attempt to monetize, they should do it in a tactful way, as to not alienate their followers.

1. Hidden Specials

A great tactic that can be used to monetize a social media following is the hidden special or promotions.  A hidden special is one that is wrapped into an otherwise normal and engaging post.  For instance, a company could post a caption competition on their Facebook page.  They could ask for their followers to come up with the funniest caption to a photo of a cat.  Then, the winners would be rewarded with a 30% off coupon.

These competitions are similar to my children’s’ soccer league, everyone wins and everyone gets a trophy.  Regardless of whether the caption is considered the funniest or not, the business could send a private message to all participants containing a 30% off coupon.

2. Focus Grouping

Another indirect way a small business can monetize a social media following is through focus grouping their followers.  Often times, small business owners create specials or sales based on their gut feelings or seasonal trends.  But, wouldn’t it be great if they knew exactly what their customers wanted to purchase, and then place those items on sale.

By simply creating a poll and asking their followers which products they wished were on sale, a small business owner would take the guess work out of sales and optimize their promotions.  Also, as a bonus, once those items are on sale, the business owner could private message the poll participants to let them know that their desired products are now on sale, creating instant sales.

3. Social Only Specials

The easiest way to gain followers and make a small business’ current followers feel valued is to offer social only specials.  These are specials that require a code or coupon in order to be claimed.  That code or coupon is delivered via social media to the company’s loyal followers.

By advertising these social only specials on the website and in the store, a small business will grow their social media followers, and give them a feeling of exclusivity.  Pretty soon, the customers will begin talking to their friends about the exclusive deals and the social media following will grow through a grass roots campaign.

There are literally hundreds of other ways a small business can tactfully monetize their social media followings.  Let us know some of your own methods in the comments below.

Google +Post Ads Take the Social Network Out Onto the Web

Google Plus Post Ads

The next age of advertising is right around the corner. With Google’s announcement of +Post ads, we now have a venue through which to advertise and garner true interaction from people as they surf the web. Think of it like Facebook advertising that reaches beyond Facebook – WAY beyond Facebook. With millions of websites out there that display Google ads, this expands the business footprint of Google’s social network in ways that Facebook will likely never be able to touch.

+Post ads take Google+ posts and display them on various websites. The example they use from their pilot programs is Toyota who used these ads to promote the launch of their Corolla earlier this year. They took Google+ posts and put them as ads on automotive sites like Autotrader as well as non-automotive sites that likely had a demographic or retargeted preference towards Toyota specifically or automotive in general.

Rather than just a plain banner that took people to the Toyota website or a landing page, the ads were interactive from the websites themselves on which they were found. If someone wanted to interact with the ad or Toyota in some way, they didn’t have to leave their website. They could comment on, +1, or share the post directly from the website without having to go to Google+.

This opens up doors for businesses to be able to truly interact with people much in the same way they’re doing on Facebook right now. The difference is, of course, that it’s not a walled garden. People will see the ads on many of the websites they visit and be able to engage with companies directly rather than having to click thru or visit the social network itself.

The possibilities are limitless. The potential is high. If Google stays true to this direction (and there’s no reason to believe that they’d make a fatal pivot) then this is going to be one of the most powerful forms of advertising that businesses can use. Small, localized businesses will gain the most benefit if they handle it properly, but big brands will be able to get traction with their own launches and offerings as well.

We will keep you updated. In the meantime, it’s time to get your Google+ pages in order, active, and worth your customers’ attention. Here’s the video describing Toyota’s trial:

Inbound Links are the Food that Fuels Your Marketing Body

Eating

There was a cry that was heard amongst many in the search engine optimization world on April 24th, 2012, as if thousands of SEOs suddenly cried out in terror, and were suddenly silenced. It was the day that Google Penguin broke link-building…

…or at least that’s what many thought. Some of us, the ones who were focused on quality rather than quantity, the ones who would work a couple of hours to get one strong, contextual, organic link rather than building tens of thousands of bulk links in the same period of time – we came out better off than we were before the algorithm change.

Google reiterated the importance of inbound links at this year’s SXSW convention and those who survived the SEOpocalypse have found that the right types of links are more powerful than they ever were in the past. Link-building has, in many ways, been replaced by link-earning. You don’t generate links anymore. You generate and expose the content that is worthy of being linked to by other websites (not to mention being shared by individuals, but that’s an entirely other body part to discuss later).

If we’re going to treat search, social, and content marketing strategy as a living organism, then inbound links would be the food that fuels the body. From a purely SEO perspective, it’s what generates the authority that Google and Bing holds so high on their ranking algorithms. As long as it’s done organically and there are no nefarious tactics used in the process, there’s very little risk involved. The upside is huge.

From a social perspective, links can drive the traffic that is necessary to get people in front of your content. Assuming the content is good enough to get links, it’s probably deserving of social media shares as well. Those shares continue to help with search engine rankings but they also help with the purely social marketing area as well.

Last but not least, it does give your website credibility in the eyes of consumers. When your website is featured in a respected website, your potential customers who see the link will be impressed. It’s subtle, but it’s also very powerful.

In the near future, I’ll be going over each of the other parts of the marketing body. In the meantime, take a look at your content and inbound link “earning” strategy and ask yourself a question:

“If I were a website visitor and came across this content, is it valuable enough for me to want to link to it from my site?”

5 Toolkits That Help Pump Up Your Content Marketing Efforts

Tool Kit

Content marketing is hard. It requires your business to take up the role of a publisher. Now, that’s not something businesses or brands are used to doing traditionally. Most of the marketing now focuses on the “inbound marketing” phenomenon and that requires patience, extreme focus on generosity, establishing trust, and providing value. It also calls for the need for thought leadership and an ever-demanding presence over the web (including blogs and social media).

All of that is hard work.

Is there a way this can be made easy for you as a business owner? They say technology is a savior, so do tools exist that help to pump up your content marketing efforts?

Here are some web-based tools you can use to accelerate, streamline, and organize your content marketing efforts:

 

Content Aggregator Tools

To develop content, you’ll need an influx of incoming content. You’d basically need to read a lot to write as much as you ought to. How do you practically crawl over the web to consume so much information that’s spewed out everyday? You get smart and use an aggregator tool!

You can start with LinkedIn’s Pulse, move on to Flipboard for your mobile, TrapIt (claimed to be the world’s most advanced content curation app), set up good sources through Feedly (an alternative for Google’s now-dead RSS reader), and finally wade through Reddit manually.

By working with these tools, you make content available to you at all times. Read, repurpose, develop content on your own string of ideas, or gather information from other content on the web to make your own brand of valuable content. Curation is a pill for content creation and aggregator tools help you do just that.

 

Content Creation, Organization and Management

Organized efforts are a must for content marketing and there are plenty of tools starting from project management to content organization. Google Drive is ubiquitous and plugs well into the workflows that most small businesses have. You might also want to check out Trello, Asana and Basecamp for organizing projects, content, and teams. To actually create content, you could use tools such as one of the ubiquitous meme generators, Visual.ly, Issuu or UberFlip.

If you are a business owner, you can use Evernote in a million different ways. Note ideas as you get them or jot down facts you can later repurpose as full-blown resource pages or social media updates. You might also use the web-clipper for content curation.

If you work with a team of social media managers and content developers or freelancers, you could bring your team aboard using Evernote for business and collaborate on ideas, content planning, blog posts, and a host of other things.

 

Plugging into a Hot Spot

Most of the popular publications now have tons of content already as “pillar content” or “resource pages.” You could visit Social Media Today for syndicated posts and resources. HootSuite has a special section with tons of resources too.

In addition to that, many other websites provide on-site tools for helping you to create even more content.

Further, you could literally create an endless flow of content based on ideas from comments, reviews and user-generated posts on communities, forums or rating sites. If you have anything to do with food and restaurants, for instance, you could use reviews from Yelp for first-hand information and then turn it into list blog posts. For technical niches such as hosting solutions or servers, you could make use of information from comparison engines such as Who Is Hosting This and cite them as sources for your blog posts.

 

Content from Social Media

Social media is big and it’s a huge resource by itself. Using a tool like Storify, for instance, you can create stories using social media data. Use Swayy to get some of the best content to share with your audience based on their interests and engagement behavior. You might also want to consider a tool such as Curata that can help you find trustworthy content quickly and curate this content to fuel your content marketing efforts.

Even without any of these tools, you can still use the dripping content off social media updates and quickly whip up posts relevant to your business niche or industry. It’s quick, it can be credited, and it works for you in multiple ways. Don’t just create content for social media; make your content attract attention off social media too.

 

Tools for Other Types of Content

While writing posts and creating content based on text is easier, it’s not the end of the road. There are videos, slide decks, podcasts, magazines, and tons of other forms of content that you should create. There are tools for you to develop this kind of content too. Animoto or GoAnimator are ideal for creating short videos. Using Jing or Camtasia, you can create screen casts to show off your products or provide courses.

You can use Blip for video podcasting or launch audio tours with iAudioGuide. If you are into audio podcasts, you may consider tools such as BlogTalkRadio or Libsyn.

While it could be a daunting task to create so many forms of content and pump up your content marketing efforts, you also have a mind-boggling and never-ending list of tools to help you create content. Most of the tools are affordable and you can also pick the tools that fit your purpose or budget.

The question is: the tools exist and the list will continue to grow. How are you going to use them? If you are in business, which of these tools are you using currently? Which of these could turn you into a full-fledged business content publisher?

How to Handle Complaints on Social Media

Social Media Complaints

There’s a rule when it comes to handling complaints and bad reviews on social media. The same rule applies for compliments and good reviews, but those are easy. Handling the complaints can be challenging and you may not want to do it, but as a rule you must reply to everyone who is talking to you publicly whether it’s good or bad.

This is an absolute rule. There are a couple of extreme situations when you don’t reply, but they are so rare that I hesitate to mention them for fear that it could downplay the message that you should reply to everyone.

There’s another rule that is unfortunately getting broken just about every day by many social media and reputation management companies. Canned responses should never be used. Every response should be personal, written by an actual human and not repeated. It’s better to make a short, sincere response than anything that came out of an automated system. People can tell. You will never appear more insincere as a company than when you reply to someone talking to you on social media with a form letter.

In this infographic by Pardot, we have a chance to take a look at five of the most prominent “complainer types” on social media. If you can identify the category that a complainer falls into, you’ll have a better opportunity to handle it appropriated. One does not have to be a psychologist to understand personality types. You just have to open your eyes and ears before opening your mouth.

Social Media Complaints Infographic

Dealer Authority: A New Venture in Automotive Internet Marketing

Dealer Authority

Change is good, sometimes. We all have those moments in our lives when we just want to branch out on our own. This is my moment.

I’ve been working for TK/KPA for the last seven years. I have absolutely nothing but positive to say about the company. They’ve treated me better than I probably deserved and I believe we’ve had a mutually beneficial relationship – both parties have grown as a result. I plan on referring KPA for many of the services that I do not offer because looking at it from the inside and seeing what else is out there, I know that they have what it takes to help their dealer clients find amazing success.

With that said, the company is still a growing corporation and I have wanted to operate in more of boutique situation for a little while. As a result, I am launching my own automotive internet marketing firm that will focus on premium social, search, and content marketing services. Dealer Authority is not for every dealership. The expectations are high and the costs will match. For the vast majority of dealers, the power I’ll be bringing to the table would be overkill. For truly aggressive dealers wanting to make a huge impact on their marketing efforts, I’m here to help.

Check out the website, get a feel for the direction that I’m heading, and make a choice: are you ready to get aggressive?

5 Practical Social Media Tips You Can Use for Your Business

Silver Bullet

Now that we’ve inhabited the Web 2.0 world for a while, social media marketing has earned its rightful place in company marketing plans. Since the proliferation of social networking sites in the early 2000s, social media marketing has catapulted from a mere option to a key factor for businesses of all sizes.

Today, more and more small businesses and large brands are taking advantage of various platforms’ power and influence, with stats and case studies to justify their usage.

Here are five tips for business owners and entrepreneurs who are willing to tap into the marketing heft of social media marketing.

1. There’s no silver bullet

Just because the term “social media marketing” has huge buzz, doesn’t mean it’s a cure-all. As with other essential components of effective marketing plans, you need to invest time and energy not only from a strategic perspective, but also on a day-by-day tactical level.

It’s not enough to say you’ve hired someone to handle social media marketing. As a business owner, you need to equip that individual with the tools to do the job properly, and not become frustrated if you don’t see results overnight. The process is labor-intensive and requires motivation and guidance from the senior level of a company, on an ongoing basis.

2. Build your social network traffic

Businesses nearly double their online traffic after they pass 1,000 Facebook likes; and they generate more than 100 percent more web traffic if they have a minimum of 51 to 100 followers on Twitter versus those with 25 or fewer.

With regard to consumer purchases, most online users rely on social media to guide their buying decisions, or purchase a product or service on a recommendation. Most social media users are also more likely to buy a product or pay for a service with a firm that’s connected with all the major social networks.

In addition, LinkedIn business pages have the most number of generated customers, ahead of Twitter and Facebook.

3. Build trust via online reputation

Having a visible online reputation creates an instant transparency and credibility. In many instances, when a company pitches clients or another company to obtain their business, the latter will first check out that company’s and their executives’ profiles on social networks, including Klout (which ranks one’s social influence across all networks).

This due diligence supports a level of trust because they can review not only how active you are but also who has recommended and worked successfully with your firm in the past.

4. Engage with your followers

Because your followers voluntarily opt to receive your marketing messages on major social networks, don’t waste that opportunity: engage with them on a regular basis.

If you’re to be successful on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and others, you must constantly engage with your followers through conversation, unique offers, and question-and-answer sessions.

Showing your followers you truly are interested in their feedback is using these user-generated platforms for the purpose they were intended.

5. Printing and social media

No longer purchasing from third-party print shops, companies have assumed much of the responsibility for printing their own content — in the form of brochures, flyers, and promos. Owners are much more in control of the content they present to the world.

Hard copies are being generated out of the feedback from the firm’s social network engagements. It’s a smart move to follow up on your social media marketing successes by referencing them in your print media as well.

Recommendations for in-house printing

For your company’s printing needs, a great resource for any small or large business is XPDrivers.com. Lexmark’s current printer drivers can resolve driver conflicts, improve a computer’s stability, and restore communication within your company’s network of printers.

Using this website’s service will save your company money and prove an effective use of your time, so you can refocus on the larger responsibilities of social media marketing.

Rumor has it… Answering on Social Media 101

Rumor

There is a lot of advice online why your company, your brand or even you should have a social media presence. With new platforms popping up every day the profiles you can have to get your name out there are near endless. Any Social Media Marketing Company will advise you to have profiles on at least facebook and Google+ and rightfully so. Done right, social media can be your best friend, helping you to get your name recognized, attract and convert new customers.

Done wrong, well, there have been a few social media disasters in the past. Even by big companies with full-fledged social media teams.  While this may seem like basic advice, it is valuable and you can thank me later. With the advancement of technology and the onslaught of immediate online feedback, it may seem like common sense, but if it were, then there wouldn’t be a need to address it.

There are new people and businesses that enter the world of social media marketing every day. People who don’t understand that online reputation is a real thing, that people take online recommendations into serious account. Brightlocal conducted a survey that found that “85% of consumers say that they read online reviews for local businesses” and “73% of consumers say positive customer reviews make them trust a business more” With the rise of mobile, I predict this number will continue to grow.

That being said, you need to have a solid strategy in place with a timeline to answer questions, comments and concerns about your company. Why? Because “word of online” travels a lot faster than “word of mouth” and rumor has it that your company….

Did that make you cringe? It made me cringe as I wrote it; rightfully so. We all want to be the shining star online but sometimes even the best can’t keep everyone happy. So what do you do when rumor has it on social networks that your company isn’t as great as you know it should be?

  • Take a breath
    Sounds simple but isn’t. Sometimes we get feedback from customers and it may or may not be justified. They may be upset, demanding, rude and downright degrading. They try to rally the masses by pointing out the injustice that happened to them. Take a deep breath. Count to 10. Take a step back and look at what happened. Think of positive ways to approach the comment.
  • Smile
    I know it’s harder but put yourself in a good mood to help yourself craft a positive response. If there is a problem, you are more than happy to fix it, because that is the motto of good customer service.
  • Type your response in Word first
    Or use a notepad if you want. The answer you craft now will be visible to everyone. This message will show your clients and potential clients how you handle negative feedback. Re-write it until it is something that you would be happy with as a disgruntled customer. Don’t use generic template responses. Customers want to be heard, understood and helped. Their situation is unique; treat it as such while staying fair and in the realm of reason.
  • Take the complaint(s) serious
    If you repeatedly receive complaints about your customer service for example, take it serious! This truly can impact whether or not you retain and attract new customers. If it is a consistent problem, look into it. Hire a consultant / trainer to teach your employees how to address and handle customers appropriately. Show that you are aware of the issue and that you are resolving it. Nothing screams “we don’t care” more than saying “we apologize for the bad experience” for 6+ months.
  • Don’t delete negative feedback
    As much as I wanted to link to an example of what not to do, how deleting comments will make you go viral in a bad way, I feel that they have suffered enough and that I can make my point without pointing fingers.
    Yes, it is absolutely tempting to hide or delete that comment that you felt was unjustified. But that’s how they felt and you are the reason why. Owning up to it may be hard but with a great response it goes a LONG way with customers.
  • Respond to Good and Bad feedback
    It’s tempting to respond to just good or just bad, but ideally you want to interact with your customers period. Let them know you hear them and care about their opinion. Build relationships with them that both sides value. Even if it is just a “Thank you” answer it has an impact.
  • Answer
    I’ve been pushing the positive response issue but that only works if you actually respond. While firing back a bad comment isn’t smart, neither is silence. Nothing is worse than silence online. Think of it this way. If you go to a restaurant and the food was cold, the server rude and you ask for the manager. He or she comes, you state your complaint and they just stare at you in silence. You complain again, they say NOTHING. Then they slowly disappear.. How would you feel? That’s exactly how your customer online feels. They are still a person behind the screen. It’s easy to forget, but that’s a topic for a different day.
  • Do NOT create FAKE reviews.
    This is really one of the worst things you can do. If you had some bad reviews and all of a sudden a lot of 5 star reviews start popping up everywhere, singing your praises.. then you don’t know how smart your customers are. They can smell a fake a mile away, they conduct research and they will call you out for it. And do NOT hire a company to write you reviews either. What happened in NY may happen to you one day. You can read more about the “Fake Review Crackdown” by Matt McGee if you think it’s a joke.
  • Deal with the Trolls
    It may be tough and unfair, but there will always be people who are out to stir the pot. They thrive on negative energy and to them it’s fun to post things to and about a business that are just not true. Best advice here, deal with it, don’t feed into it and take it with a sense of humor. Don’t let it get the best of you.
  • Learn
    There is an incredible amount of knowledge in reviews and comments online. If you learn the art of listening, you will hear what your customers want, need and even what they hate. It can be a tremendous resource to you if you take the time to talk to them and listen. Ask their advice even, they will tell you what they think the problem is. I am not saying you should take everything they say at face value, but learn with and from your customers, then adjust accordingly and within the limits of what is possible for you to do.

Rumor has it.. that you just understood the importance of good customer service in the world of social media. I also want you to really understand how fast “bad” news travels online. It’s instant. It spreads like wildfire. It becomes distorted as it gets passed on kind of like the whisper game I played as a kid. Be prepared, know how to respond, know what is going on in your business and make sure you communicate with your customers. Keep the line of communication open, so  ”Rumor has it” only stays a song.

Have you ever been at the receiving end of “rumor has it”? Share your stories and connect with me. I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.

Good and Bad Examples of Social Media Image Marketing

Automotive Social Media Image Marketing

If you’re reading this, you’re probably failing at social media image marketing. That’s not me being cynical. By examining dozens of business social media presences every week, I get to see what so many are doing and the unfortunate fact is that 9 out of 10 are doing it wrong or not doing it at all. I’m being conservative with that estimate.

The “unfortunate” fact really isn’t that unfortunate, especially for those who are reading this. You see, you can actually do it right, which means that you’re going to have a leg-up on the competition. When things are too easy or too well known, they have a tendency to become universally good. When they’re universally good, that means that everyone is average.

Image marketing on social media is not about taking advertisements and posting them as images. It’s not about talking about your big sale next week in the form of a banner that you post to Twitter or Instagram (though there’s a way to do that which I’ll demonstrate below). It’s not even about taking pictures of happy customers in front of their latest purchase jumping in the air with the caption, “Oh what a feeling!”

Proper image marketing should accomplish some of the following goals listed in no particular order:

  1. Improve branding
  2. Promote an upcoming event
  3. Demonstrate a lifestyle advantage associated with your product
  4. Connect with the community
  5. Make a statement
  6. Drive traffic to a landing page

It doesn’t have to do all of these. It can do one of them really well, a couple of them very well, or knock out three or four of them with a single post. To highlight this, I’ll use examples that I found in my Twitter feed just in the last couple of hours. This does not only apply to Twitter; Instagram, Google+, Pinterest, and Facebook can all work nicely here.

It should be noted that size and aspect ratio are extremely important and arguably the biggest miss by most. Twitter has an aspect ratio of 2:1 while Instagram is 1:1. Small images don’t do as well. on any of the platforms. Pinterest is the only platform that does vertical images well. Appearance on mobile is more important than appearance on desktop. These and other technical aspects of image marketing will be covered in a future post. For now, let’s just look at the content…

 

Bad Examples of Social Media Image Marketing

These ones are bad. Don’t do these. I blocked out the business that posted one but I kept the one posted by Ram only because as a manufacturer, they should know better by now…

Bad Twitter Image Marketing

The image quality is poor. The car is cut off. There’s no visible branding for the dealership in the image. Overall, it’s extremely boring. This is not going to get anyone’s attention and nobody who sees it in their feed will care.

* * *

Bad Twitter Image Marketing 3

It’s a nice image of a mountain. Wait. Is that a truck at the bottom peeking up over the edge? It’s good that they are getting their fans involved, but the picture should have been edited to appear properly on Twitter before posting it. This is the lazy way out and accomplishes none of the goals.

 

Decent Examples of Social Media Image Marketing

These aren’t bad. They aren’t good, either. They’re good enough to get listed here just to show the differences between them and the ones further below so you’ll know what mistakes to avoid.

Decent Twitter Image Marketing

The attempt by Nissan is pretty strong. They’re trying to do well on Twitter and they’re doing an above-average job at it. This particular piece is missing something: impact. The message in the image means nothing other than stating a minor incentive. It gives no reason for people to actually click through to the landing page other than the boring message itself. With image marketing, you need to make a statement in order to get clicks. They should have put more creativity into the messaging rather than state the offer plainly.

More importantly, the offer itself is designed specifically for those who already plan on buying a Rogue, so the incentive is in the reservation itself. At first (and second, and third) glance, this appears to be another rebate offer because it looks like another rebate offer. There are brighter minds than mine that could have fashioned a better message, but it should have been less statement of the facts and a bit more mystery and uniqueness to draw people to click.

  • This Rogue wants to be reserved (and it will pay you to reserve it)
  • What do reservations and $250 have in common? The 2014 Nissan Rogue.
  • Early Bird gets the cash on their Rogue
  • No Reservations Necessary (unless you want an extra $250)

* * *

Decent Twitter Image Marketing 2

This isn’t bad because it does accomplish one goal – making a statement. The only thing keeping this at decent rather than good is that the message is a personal one and should have been delivered in a personal manner. While the picture is cool and the message in the text is strong, it would have been better to have a member or former member of the military (there’s probably some working at the dealership right now) by a car or the dealership’s sign with an American flag in hand. This is a bit generic but a good attempt – still better than 9 out of 10.

 

Good Examples of Social Media Image Marketing

Here are some good ones. These are nearly great but are missing a couple of minor components. If you did your marketing like this, you’d be ahead of 99/100 others.

Good Twitter Image Marketing

Great aspect ratio. Hot car. Good message and most importantly there’s a link to the inventory search for the vehicle itself!

* * *

Good Twitter Image Marketing 2

This one is much like the previous except a different variation for two reasons. First, it uses a stock image, which is only good if the image is as good as this one. The thing that brings it up from “decent” is that the link takes you to a vehicle specific landing page which is more appropriate on Twitter than a straight vehicle search. Remember, if they want to search, they will. Putting them on a page with information about the vehicle is better for higher-funnel customers that you’ll get through social media.

 

Great Examples of Social Media Image Marketing

These are the best that I’ve seen so far… after searching four hours back in my Twitter feed. There are better ones. There are plenty of worse ones. They aren’t perfect but they’re pretty darn close.

Great Twitter Image Marketing

This one hits goals 1, 5, and 6 nicely but it really nails home #3: Demonstrate a lifestyle advantage associated with your product. It doesn’t need to show the whole car. It doesn’t need a beautiful background. It has a simple, elegant four word message that can reach the target audience where it hurts.

* * *

Great Twitter Image Marketing 2

Remember, it doesn’t have to nail several goals to be effective. This time, it does a wonderful job of branding but keeps it touching the community with the localized weather factor. This is exceptional and if the following is engaged, it’ll resonate.

* * *

Great Twitter Image Marketing 3

Simple and powerful. This is what Nissan missed when they promoted their message. Well done, Mr Potratz and Mr Ziegler.

* * *

You don’t have to be a professional photographer or a creative genius to get it right with social media image marketing. You just need to have a good strategy, solid execution, and a willingness to know the “rules” well enough to break them ever so slightly.

The Folks from @Charmin Understand Social Media

Charmin Social Media

Don’t squeeze the social… unless you’re Charmin, in which case your actions on social media are probably brilliant. That has been the case for a little while as the team handling Charmin’s social media presence keep rolling out the hits and victories.

Brands both small and large can learn a lot from the company whose mascot is a bear with a pink bow on its head. The example below isn’t even close to their best stuff (for that, click through to Social Media Explorer below) but it’s just one of many recent ones that stands out much better than what others are posting on their social media.

 

Here’s everything you need to know about their campaigns from Social Media Explorer:

How many of you are passionate about your toilet paper? I ask that when I speak about content marketing and very few hands fly up in the air. It’s a nice lead-in to talk about Charmin and how it engages consumers on social media channels.

Read More: Social Media Explorer